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20121201
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of the internet and it more than anywhere else. new york, london, tokyo. there are interesting outliers. places like ashford, virginia and another not far from dulles airport. you asked the engineers where the v that is, they would take new york, los angeles, and ashford. theyere the cetnernter is, would say new york, los angeles, hford.wn for -- asked for i you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall are very generic. deliberately so. they try to hide inside when you tried id.. a try to hide them in plain sight. others have operators -- what operators like to call a science fiction movie. that is deliberate. it are modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. when you walk in, it is a bit like walking into a machine. the buildings are incredibly loud and cold from the air- conditioners that keep the machines cool. you cannot see the ceiling. there are usually cages around. big steel cages about half the size of a hotel room. each belongs to a network. that is wher
and the gulf coast who live with these things regularly. new york state, as you know, suffered nearly $7.3 billion in transportation-related damages due to superstorm sandy. of that total, the new york mta suffered about 5 billion in dages. it's huge. i never saw anything like it. we have the longest underground tunnel in the world in the brooklyn battery tunnel. i take it almost every day i'm in new york city because my home in brooklyn is connected to it. it was totally filled with water. both tubes, from one end to the other, from the manhattan end to the brooklyn end. ere were close to 100 million gallons of water that had to be pumped out of that tunnel and it's still not back up to snuff. that's one of many examples. there's so many. the mta did a very good job. i want to congratulate joe lhota. they moved their rolling stock to high ground. tried to barricade this awful flood in the best way they could. boy, it's awful. the mta is the largest public transportation system in the country. it's the life blood of new york. it's our circulatory system. 3.5 million people g on and off m
. these involve estates and dish payments. a major concern when crafting the aca was that my state, new york, as a do-gooder state, was not penalized. also for dish, i wanted to make sure that york city was not penalized. the new york medicaid program already covers most categories of individuals beyond the expansion threshold in the affordable care act. however, it is projected that after the aca is fully implemented in new york, 10% of our residents will still remain uninsured, which means that dish funding will still remain important. ms. mann, i know you and i spoke about this a few weeks ago. i just want to reiterate how important this is for states that already have broad eligibility for medicaid programs. as you know, that is a very big concern of mine. i hope these requirements will not punish these states. let me ask dr. sharfstein and dr. allison, can you talk about how declining funding for uncompensated care and dish influenced your decision to push the medicaid expansion in your states? >> just to give one example from maryland. we have a unique way of funding uncompensated care
. >> this will be the last one. [inaudible] new york city i'm actually very happy about the discharge petition. it's already exceed my expectations in the speed of which our members being here only a limited amount of time this week were able to snand line and stand the petition. the fact is that it's about getting people to sign. it's also about bringing pressure on the leadership to say why are you not bringing this to the floor. is this a forever protection of the wealthiest people in our country at the expense of the middle class. this decoupling is strat to solving our fiscal challenge that we have now. don't you wonder yourself why the american people almost 100%, i've never seen a poll that says 100%,over whemingly support. this democrats and republicans support. the senate passed it, the president is poised to sign it. why would they block that except to protect the high end? >> we'll take one more. >> [inaudible] did you have any concern about increased debt over to the executive branch. >> my understanding is they are talking about the mcconnell rule which is the president would send his proposal
is an investigative reporter with the "new york times." mr. glanz, what is an internet datacenter? >> it is a place where all the information you sent out from your communicatocomputer or mobe goes into process and storage. >> how big are these centers? >> there actually colossal. their colossal in the amount of electricity they use. some use as much electricity as a medium-sized town. it is a very secretive industry. they tend to be hiding in plain sight. littlees you'll see diesel generators on the side. those are backup power supplies. and it is a data center. >> were those located at the road they're all over the place. they're in high rises in cities, in greenfield sites out in suburban areas, there tucked away in the back of offices. they are the way that most commerce takes place now. everyone has to have one. there are concentrations of the in the country. northern virginia, silicon valley. they're everywhere at this point. >> who runs them? >> a variety of players. companies that need these for their regular business owns some of these data centers, everything from walmart to microsoft. th
to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy. so much of what they sell and they produce is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as
from new york, mrs. maloney, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 6379. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized, and without objection. mr. farenthold: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 6379, introduced by the gentleman from south carolina, mr. clyburn, would designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 6239 savannah highway in ravenel, south carolina, as the representative curtis b. inabinett sr. post office. this bill was introduced on september 12. mr. speaker, mr. inabinett is a longstanding and faithful citizen of south carolina. he was born there in 1931 and attended grade school, college and graduate school in the state. later, he taught at baptist high school in charleston county and was appointed to the charleston county election commission. he became the medicare of ravenel, south carolina, and joined the s
ago. this is from the front page of today's "new york daily news." finally, from the front page is this report about what is ahead in terms of the gun control fight. we heard from the nra friday. let me read you a few sentences -- that was nearly 20 years ago in 1993. we will hear from that testimony in a couple of minutes. we want to get your calls and what is ahead in gun-control. roy is joining us from north carolina, the independent line, good morning. caller: it could be a bitter fight but i think some drastic action needs to be taken. it should be at least as burdensome for the gun owner as it is for a car owner. registration, insurance, testing, everything -- handguns are a big problem, too. i think it is so bad that the president should do some kind of executive order and put a moratorium on military rifles, at least, because around here in western north carolina, there are gun shops and people waiting for four hours to get to this ar-15. they say they will not take it out of the box, the majority of them. they will either have it as an investment or have it grandfathere
. residents gather to find comfort and pray. and national newspapers also digging into the story. the new york times saying -- victims there, white and friends with a background. there is a detail of how teachers helped students three crisis. other articles looking at the alleged killer and the victim's. and another story today -- "the justice department shows ideas about background checks." at after the shooting of gabrielle giffords and others of a supermarket in 2011, the justice department expanded the background checks to reduce the likelihood of guns falling into the hands of the mentally ill and criminals. the election campaign heated up and congress conducted a politically-charged investigation into the operation fast and furious gun trafficking case, according to people familiar with the internal deliberations. looking at some other stories in the news -- the washington post also covers that keeping the justice department had to toughen gun laws ahead of the election. that is the headline. much of the effort was put on hold until after last month's election. according to several offic
with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time with obama. the reason why i say it does a little bit, you have to have a conscience when you deal with anything. especially when you make decisions for other people than yourself, you have to have a conscience. w
new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery. it tells us with hope that we can get something done quickly. when we explain to our colleagues what we needed they listened carefully. we were really very glad about that. let me say a few specific things. there is very ample funding in this bill. homeowners lost more than $31,000 of damage in their home. they can get relief so that small-business owners who need more than loans can get to relief. there's ample funding for the army corps. it was free with all of the aid here. a couple more plants. mitigation is in this bill. they are not new projects that come out of the blue. they are building on existing products to prevent damage from occurring it got forbid another sandy like storm hit us. it will allow to install concrete polls rather than the wooden poles they had. it will allow our subway system and june to put in protection so that the waters will not flood the damn again. it will allow our hospitals when they rebuild to make sure that they put those extremely expensive machines on higher floors so if god forbid
from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on. they're still communities that are challenged. the scale has treated significant challenges. this a require a sustained effort a part of the local officials. voluntary earlier this week i had the chance t
? there is a new york times story that points out of the time of the crisis in benghazi they had no forces that could be sent. there were no armed drowns within range. given the potential for further on the breast and enter syria and egypt and across the middle east, it seems to me that is a question that is really critical as we looked at how we continue to provide protection for the personnel on the ground. >> first with regard to this specific issue of benghazi. there was simply not enough time for military force to respond it. you raise a broader question and something we will be working there with your colleagues did enter the pentagon and elsewhere. >> given the potential for unrest across the middle east i would hope we would follow up on the specific question because it seems to me to be critical as we look at the situation going forward. i would add my personal thanks and appreciation, it has been an honor to serve with you. you leave a tremendous legacy for this committee and for the country. thank you. >> let me say that i have thought a lot about what you have said with respect
four time a year. his office was in new york and in new jersey. when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut, sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and we would discuss some of the things that had not been able, but a certain amount of stuff i cannot pursue. -- could not pursue. >> did you ever get any insight on how watergate happen? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably 1992 or thereabout, he told me and indicated that john mitchell have thought so too, that this book that was coming out, "silenced coup," they thought that was probably some of what happened the guy " said mitchell on the cover on one of his editions that they thought this was sort of our happened. so i got that sense from nixon. practical back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it > how did your research and where did you have to go? how long a process? you talk about going all over the east coast, on the back. correct the principal thing i did was i had been interested in the revolution since i was a kid. i think i was probably eight or n
new york times ." this is from the business section of "the new york times." there is this from the money section of "usa today." from "the wall street journal," and this headline from "the washington post." we have news from morning programs, where chuck schumer told nbc that he is in courage to mitch mcconnell his getting actively involved in talks. republican senator john stone noted the meeting among the president and congressional leaders is encouraging because people are talking. we want to check in. in the two hours since we last talked, any news you could clean? guest: no disrespect, but no. they are realistic these things often get resolve the blessed minute. it would not shock me if we are still talking like this 48 hours from now. the deadline it is 11:50 9:00 p.m. on the first. it looks bleak, but there are only five or six people that really know what is going on, and they are not talking to us. the effected they're talking to each other is encouraging. -- the fact that they are talking to each other is encouraging. host: let's walk through the scenarios. there is a
is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do not think it goes far enough. i think it was greenspan that i heard last week said in a discussion panel that a recession as a result of going over the fiscal slope would be a small price to pay to pay back all the bills, the $16 trillion, that this country owes. so, i don't think -- i would like to see with all the talk that we hear from the republican side about their interest in getting down this that the set and debt, you would think that and across the board cut of 10% that forces and i believe even that taxes should go up on the 98% and that it would put us in a position to really make a huge dent in the bills that we owe. i know some very wealthy, politically active, savvy people in new york and washington, d.c. i can tell you that the wealthy in this country are fighting tooth and nail applying pressure to the political insiders do not have their taxes raised. it is a part of their in come, it is a part of what they look at
new york served from 1996-1998 and from 2005 until the present. they will all be retiring from congress at the end of the year. the record will remain open for five business days for any member of the committee who wishes to submit a statement or additional questions. if there is nothing further, we are adjourned. thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explore the history and literary culture of albany this week and on c-span2 and c-span3. first, a fema and hud on the ongoing recovery from the storm. the centers from york and new jersey will speak out the storm impacted their states. -- the senators from new york and new jersey bespeak about how the storm impacted their states. this could be triggered in january of next year. our guest is robert levenson. then a roundtable discussion on house we castration -- house sequestration can affect the budget policy. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern here on c-span. >> we are at the new york state museum. this is our gallery dedicated to the
. let me offer you our best in this effort. mr. king has been the state director of the new york small business development center. he oversees 24 regional centers, 35 outbreaks centers. all of your experience must certainly be called bond at tested for the job that is ahead of you. the president and ceo of long island association, one of the most respected organizations in new york. he long island economy is made up of businesses, 90% employ 20 people or less. we are interested in what your businesses are saying, how we can be as helpful as possible. businesses,our hearts go out te that you have lost and the devastation. make sure that your buttons are pressed and you're speaking directly into the microphone. >> good morning, committee members. it is a privilege and honor to be here today. hoboken is located just across the river from new york city and is the home of frank sinatra. we have hundreds of businesses that call our square-mile city there,. we are one of the most densely populated cities in america, more than new york city. we rank no. 1 in per-capita use of public transport
these discussions to the american people and i look forward to hearing from my friend from new york and what he has to say. we have talked about time and again about the importance of what we are trying to accomplish in this house in protecting the medicare program. i represent a district that has 135,000 medicare beneficiaries. it's actually the fourth most medicare beneficiaries of any congressional district in the country. so the people that i represent have a strong interest, as does every member of this house in making sure that medicare is preserved, it's protected and strengthened and it's always going to be be there, not just for the 135,000 beneficiaries that participate in the medicare program today, but for generations to come. and we aren't going to stand here as democrats or republicans or any political affiliation and say that everything is working perfectly and nothing needs to be altered. the fact is with regard to medicare that 1/3 of the people who qualify for medicare, 1/3 of the people who qualify for medicare today use every penny that they have paid into the system over the co
. >> the gentle lady from new york. the gentleman reserves. >> thank you. let me give the minister to the gentleman from massachusetts. >> the gentleman from last -- let me give three minutes to the gentleman from massachusetts. >> mr. speaker, just when i thought the process in this house cannot get any worse, the republicans reached a new low. we were originally told we were meeting on the speaker's so- called plan b tax bill, zapotecs tax cuts for the wealthy at the expense of middle -- that he attacks tax cuts for the wealthy at the expense of middle-class families. i am not sure to call this one, plan b 2.0, plan c, we do not really have a plan plan? it is similar to the reconciliation bill the republicans brought to the floor and a few months ago. it costs $36 billion from thes.n.a.p. program -- the s.n.a.p. program. hundreds of thousands of kids would lose their access to free meals. the bill threatens medicare, children's programs, education, infrastructure. it threatens our economy as a whole. it not only protect the pentagon budget, it increases and that billions of dolla
by the history of "the new york times." on friday's "washington journal" a look at the countdown to the fiscal cliff. our guest will be damian paletta. then homeownership in the u.s. with randallo tool. later, the discussion of the economy, poverty, and hunger. caroline radcliff. "washington journal" live every morning starting at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces that are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> i think i have little antennas that went up and told me when somebody had their own agenda. >> there is so much influence in that office and it is shame to waste it. >> they serve on a window on the past with what is going on with american women. >> sh she is the only one they can trust. >> many of the women were writers. they were journalist, they wrote books. >> they are more interesting as human beings than their husbands. if only because they are not first and foremost defined a
, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak. if an agreement is not reached in time between senator harry reid and harry mcconne
. crowley speaks, obviously from new york. first of all, we need to pass the supplemental. the people of the northeast, luckily maryland was somewhat spared on this. but the people of new jersey, the people of new york, the people of connecticut in particular, others as well, have sustained a very, very damaging blow both corporately and individually. we need to act on that. historically supplementals are not paid for, are passed so that we can meet the immediate need. mr. crowley will speak to that. but let me say this. the answer to your question is it's part of the math. if we're going to put our country on a fiscally sustainable path, we're going to have to consider all the expenditures we made, whether we paid for them initially or not, we're going to have to put that into the math and it needs to be a part of the agreement. i've said this is a math problem. certainly the dollars we spend will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer period of time. but we can amortize that immediate expense that we need to make on behalf of the severely adversely affec
. >> let's give some reality to an " opt -- involving medical. the study was driven by new york solely. in man although it was not significant, the expansion resulted in poor outcomes among those on medicaid. it was not statistically significant, but that was driven by the state of new york. in regard to the do-gooder states, new york pays physicians less well than does louisiana and texas and only 60% of positions in new york accept medicaid. that is not access. just to clear of the record a little bit. now that we know that the one thing that has been shown to lower costs will not be allowed in the lmr unless it is spent -- we are now encouraging insurance companies not to sell them or to encourage the person to sell it -- what data do you have on the effect of the increase premium costs on some who say 200% of federal poverty level who is currently employed with sponsored insurance and dumped into the exchange of mackenzie quarterly that says what 30% of these employers will do have a value of 60%? what do you project will happen to that person? >> we have been modeling the path to
on a street corner in new york and some woman thought this was cute, this little boy handing out leaflets and she asked why i made the case for lindsey and got an early start on my political consulting career and made the case for his opponent as well. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, whit box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and we opened it up and there was all of these doughnuts and a lot of 10 dollar bills. so in one of my early lessons in politics the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnut. >> tuesday night at 8:00 david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire's first all-women delegation. at 10:45, growing up in the white house with two women. that is tuesday evening on c-span. >> as president obama begins his second term in office what is the most important issue to consider in 2013? tell us. make a shord video about your message to the president. it is c-span's student video competition with the chance to win a grand prize of $5,000 and $50,000 in total
years. that being said, i think he took cruises over to the mediterranean, over to the new york. when the seas were rough, churchill insisted on watching the storm, being held there by four or five -- he described them -- as brown, burly, greek sailors. when they took their meals during those storms come they would sit on the floor with bottles of champagne between their knees. this 88, 90-year-old man -- well, not 90, but in his late 80's. he lived a very rich life. and of course, the second premier ship in the early 1950's. i think lady soames is correct and she knows her father. the last years were a slow descent. diana, the daughter, died of an overdose of barbiturates. he did not quite get it. by 88, 89, the christmas of 1964 they brought in fresh oysters and champagne. his private secretary was there. his children. christmas dinner lasted well into the 26th, and i think it was january 29 winter chill refused his brandy and cigars after dinner for the first time ever. he went into a coma and his doctor -- both doctors said, it is a question now if it is going to be a day. and it
need help. we desperately need help in the new york, new jersey area. last night two billion people around the world tuned into a benefit concert to help raise money for sand's reliefestings and now it is time for the government to step up to the place. congress has stepped up 39 times to help state and local governments to respond to disasters. there is a wisdom here that has been in the federal government for decades. that is, when god's hand strikes no localities can handle it on their own. we unite as a nation to help one another. following katrina the government passed aid following 10 days of after the storm. we passed nine fundamentals a total of $108 billion and frankly, the damage from sandy, the economic damage is worse. they lost about 270,000 homes and in new york we lost 305,000 homes. that is new york alone. they had about 20,000 small businesses, put out of business, gone. we have over 270,000. so the damage is enormous. and you know, we members of new york delegation have always been there when other parts of the nation were struck by distafters. new york tax dollars
: guy is a business owner in hillsdale, new york. caller: i have a small music label. i discovered some news by kurt bayo. i cannot get a major label to put the music out, so i decided do it myself. host: have you looked at the fiscal cliff and how it may affect your plans for 2013? caller: of course. this is all about paying for the wars, to me. host: as a business owner, how is it going to affect you? caller: it is not going to affect me. these are taxes i should have been paying a long time ago. host: ted is in los angeles. good morning. caller: good morning. i have a comment and question. when i am trying to say is at the turn-of-the-century, major leaders saw the need to change the 12-hour workday to the eight-hour workday, which brings us to the present. my question is, does the work they need to be changed maybe to a six-hour day in order to order accommodate employment for the growing america? i used to own a graphic arts business. it was very difficult to keep employees. i ended up being the only employee. host: you are retired now? caller: yes. host: steve in phoenix, kind of
and former chancellor of new york city public-school, joel klein, hosted by the foundation for excellence and education. this is about an hour. >> welcome to this evening's bought test of morning joe. [laughter] the energy in this room is nice. how this issue of educational reform has ripened, the combination of need, the talent we see in this room. there is a sense that the moment has a ride. the other is jeb bush. i am a great believer that two things matter in life -- ideas and people. that is the driver of change in history. jeb is a perfect example of in what he is doing. he is the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. the fact that you are here is the greatest salute you could give. condie and that, the the national security background. we used to mess around with something called the rand bond calculated. it used to calculate the cep, t he circular error robert roe -- error probable. are today. we have travelled a considerable distance. when asked what the great -- the greatest national-security threat is, he did not say al qaeda, iran, north korea, what he said w
in on friday, weighed heavily for community development's to help new york and new jersey recover from hurricane sandy. most of the focus is on the immediate recovery, it includes $13 billion as a downpayment towards longer-term payments to protect against future disaster. the question this morning is, as the president begins on his second term, john is joining us from illinois. caller: i will distract a little bit. i hear so much talk about cutting entitlements. we never hear about over spending government waste. cutting some of the money that we need a in order to serve our country. why can we ever hear about where money is going that it should not go like research for monkey science. that is my comment. host: thank you for the call. john on the republican line. caller: i just wanted to say i think the number one priority -- the biggest thing we are seeing in the business world, small businesses are not able to borrow money to expand it. no help from the banks whatsoever. we had to go to independent leasing program. i do not understand why president obama is the president everybody t
. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, the assistant democrat leader, mr. clyburn. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for three minutes. mr. clyburn: thank you, mr. speaker. i request permission to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. clyburn: i thank the gentlelady for yielding me this time. mr. speaker, when the so-called supercommittee failed last year to overcome the obstruction of the tea party republicans and their leader, grover norquist, to achieve a fair and balanced plan for deficit reduction, economic growth, and job creation it would take a decisive national election to settle the matter. i believe president obama's victory on november 6 was very decisive and pretty definitive. during the campaign president obama very clearly laid out his vision and the american people strongly affirmed his position. the president won all but one of the swing states. 62% of the electoral college, and carried the popular vote by more than 4.
on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. roth would read the newspaper and about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [
broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay who is running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party to work for him i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was cute, this little boy handing out leaflets and chest and why and i made the case for john lindsay and got an early start on my political consulting career and made the case against his opponent as well. she said that is so cute and she handed me a box of pastry, a white box with string, and it took a back to the liberal party headquarters and we opened it up and there was all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons and politics, the district's lawyer grabbed the mom -- grab the money and said you can keep the donuts. [laughter] >> david axelrod to night on his life in politics. at 10:45, growing up in the white house with susan ford bales and lynda robb. >> house speaker john boehner let the capitol christmas tree. this year's tree is from the colorado white national forest. >> good evening, everyone. and welcome to the 48th
to the rule, the gentlewoman from florida, ms. ros-lehtinen, and the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker, and i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to insert extraneous materials into the record on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for as much time as she wishes to consume. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of house resolution 134, introduced by my good friend and colleague from illinois, mr. dold. house resolution 134 condemns the iranian regime's persecution of iran's baha'i minority. baha'i are the largest non-muslim population in iran, numbering over 300,000 members in iran alone. mr. speaker, this resolution marks the 12th congressional action urging the iranian regime to end its persecution of the baha
. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed, quote, global warming has begun, expert tells senate. a quarter century later, dr. hansen and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states that basic scientific observation -- seas are rising, glaciers are disappearing, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. about half of amer
fossil fuels was hurting the earth's atmosphere. the next day, and new york times had nine set global warming has begun. a quarter-century later, he and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states. seas are rising, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. half of americans now accept that fact. 40% to not, according to gallup. we will discuss climatized communication, public policy and opinion with james hansen and our live audience here at the commonwealth club of california. today dr. hanson received a steven schneider award for outstanding communication. he was a pioneering scientist at stanford. please welcome dr. hansen. [applause] >> welcome back. it has been two years since you were here. i would like to begin with hurricane sandy. you lived in manhattan. where were you when it was approaching? >> i was on our farm in pennsylvania. where we ended up losing power for the better part of a week. four big trees blown over. railing's blown off. our deck and windows blown out of the barn. even in pennsylvania, separate it from the atlantic ocean by n
. the quality of life is certainly different. in new york, where i live, $250,000 is peanuts compared to living in a different state. you could have a huge house. if you are in new york, you will probably get an apartment. i see democrats, especially the president, as unwilling to negotiate with each other. my hope and prayer is that the country comes out strong by january 1 with extended tax breaks. >> here is a quick look at the tax increases, this is from " washington journal." "changes -- this is from "the washington journal." "many of these are expected to revert to clinton era levels." >> starting out the sunday shows, president obama with an interview on "meet the press." and their efforts in congress. here is what he had to say. [video clip] >> i am confident that we will see an agreement in the next 48 hours. if that does not happen, democrats in the senate will put a bill on the floor of the senate and republicans will have to decide whether or not they will block it, meaning that middle-class taxes go up. i do not think that they would want to do that, politically, but they may wind
dribbled in. they were rust buckets and virtually obsolete. which roosevelt told t"new york times" and congress. he said we gave them junk and we get six or seven caribbean naval bases from the empire. at one point that summer i believe churchill wrote a letter and asked roosevelt to declare war. that is how desperate he was. and so after a few brandies in t the co vilville diaries churchi says they want to us bleed to death and pick up everything that is left for free. at one point they were thinking around the dipper table of having everyone in england melt their wedding rings because it might raise $8 million or $10 million of gold and use that to buy american goods because it was all cash and carry, to shame the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he interested in? what is in his head. try to place churchill in his tim times. he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of the geography, the politics, the milita
account. given money away like in new york and new jersey. $60 billion or $80 billion. don't they have insurance of the up there? host: thank you for the call. is this from bill king. this is bob, good morning. caller: happy new year. host: to you, too. caller: all the republican party has to do is to allow for what the voters voted on by putting obama back in office, which was the mandate that people earning above $250,000 pay 4.5%.eer lousy that is not a hair off their chinny-chin-chin. everybody is looking to fight against the tax increase for the wealthiest people. they take a ski vacation in france and a cost $20,000. they spend money like it is garbage. cheerleading for tax breaks for people who do not need it. they have admitted they do not need it. the republicans and the democrats are not facing the key issue with our budget, which is medical cost. it is insanity we do not hear enough and i wish c-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- i
. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: thank you very much. the gentlewoman makes a number of good points -- points. we did pass in the house the violence against women act that passed may 16 of this year, 222-205. the house has passed, by the way, 256 of our colleagues to 171 what's tchailed job protection recession prevention act and it was passed on august -- ms. slaughter: will the gentleman yield? mr. sessions: i will in a second. it would have extended all current rates and compelled congress to enact meaningful tax reform in 2013. we passed this. we said we ought to do what we should do. and that was back in august and i would yield to the gentlewoman. ms. slaughter: thank you, mr. sessions. i know you, i know tt you understand, i've talked about thisbut that bill that passed this house excluded a large number of the women basically what this house said with that vote was go ahead and beat them up. we don't want them covered. after the election, after what everybody has been through after what the american plic thinks abo
news" -- also "l.a. times" -- i will take to "a "boston globe"" -- "the boston globe" -- the new york post -- the story i want to start with this morning is from politico. that line is -- senate leaders are headed into a critical sunday session of congress with a similar mission to avoid historic tax hikes, setting the stage for a high wire a final act of fiscal cliff negotiating just two days before the country is hit with a series of tough austerity measures. -- that again is from politico this morning. you're getting your thoughts, and we want to hear your message to congress on the fiscal cliff negotiations. the politico story mentioned what was happening on saturday evening on capitol hill. here is the washington post -- the washington post also offers a handy time line of what is set to happen today in the countdown to the cliff. at 1:00 p.m., the senate is set to reconvene. at 2:00 p.m., the house reopens. -- tonight or tomorrow, on monday -- that is our schedule, the fiscal cliff count down today. i want to turn out to nancy cook of the national journal. she is here to give us
in the new york times showing they feel he is dragging his feet and waiting until january 3. i also understand that the chairman of the government oversight and reform committee darrell issa, which is from our district here, is holding up the vote on the women against violence act also, which involves the illegals, native americans, and lgbt. this is a coal in the christmas stocking for women who helped to get president obama reelected, and is an attack on medicaid for women that have children, and seniors and -- host: we will leave it there. thanks for calling. olean is in tennessee, republican -- leeann. caller: we need to have more cuts. look at all the thousands obama has put on the payroll. we have 109 million government workers. 49 million people on food stamps whole. them with a free cell phone that has been given to them. if he cannot find any place to cut anything, how about 16,000 block that he's putting on disability. $16,000.ws and dollar host: where did you get that figure? caller: the pennsylvania department of public welfare was talking about how people on welfare are
. leslie, go ahead. caller: yes. i'm originally from northern maine and moved here from northern new york and i personally had a second-grade and third-grade teacher killed from mentally unstable students. one used a knife and one beat a teacher. i personally believe this is a mental health problem and everybody knew they had problems. until they take care of the mental health problem, you're going to continue to have deaths. host: so you say you're in support of having armed guards in schools around the country? >> yes, i am. caller: i'm a 23-year army veteran and i've hunted and fished all my life. host: there were reports that there was an affirmed guard at columbine and that didn't seem to deter those boys from doing -- causing the mayhem that they had. caller: that was a large campus at columbine, and you've got to have gareds at the gate and if you have a huge place, you need more than one guard. i've been in combat in the army. host: where were you? thank you for your service. caller: i'd like to make a couple of points, the n.r.a. and republicans are wrong. to have armed guards i
office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut or sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and some of the things that had not been the school -- had not been discussedable before. >> did you ever get in setting to watergate and how that happened? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably in 1992 or thereabouts. he told me and he indicated that john mitchell thought so, too, that this book that was coming out, "silent coup" -- do you remember that one? that was probably some of what happened. he quoted mitchell on the cover. they thought that this was sort of how it happened. so i got that sense from him. >> going back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it to? how did your research it? how do have to go? -- how did you have to go? >> i have been interested in the revolution since there was a little kid. i was probably eight or nine when i would make a list of generals. i did nothing that was heading for anything very useful, but i always enjoyed that. th
, and that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, huge amount of damage. they have incredible new york city is resilient, and how well they are coming back. i think they got about 95% of their transit operations, rail was particularly hit. almost all of east side lower manhattan tunnels flooded, and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all passengers in the world in new york city. and a hit like that was incredible. i understand mayor bloomberg, we met with yesterday, will be in town today, and we had discussions yesterday about fema, which our committee oversees and also transportation and infrastructure that was hurt. that may be the subject of additional scrutiny by the committee, but today, again, we are focused on looking particularly at amtrak's structural organization. i might also recall that with the last hearing what we'll be doing on the northeast corridor, our
'll never crush the spirit of the workers but they have used the law with no public hearings new york committee action, no regular course of action during the legislation, during the legislative session, which is a lame duck legislative session by the way, no regular order, just a sneak attack thursday morning, the sixth of november, one month after the landslide election in michigan and throughout this country, that turned back the corporate money that was arrayed against the democrats. and arrayed against president obama. it turned that back. a resounding victory on november 6, on december 6, a sneak attack while during a lame duck session with no public hearings, no committee action, sneak attack. they announced it that morning, thursday morning. the sixth. and by 8:00 p.m. action to pass crush the union laws have passed to -- have passed both houses, house and senate, in michigan. less than 10 hours. it took to bing down 75 years of prosperity for all. now why would anyone want to crush the union and i'm not calling them right-to-work laws because as i told you earlier, there is n
with all due respect to our new york colleagues in the senate, some of them have ever been in the majority and some of them have never been in the minority which sometimes dictates behavior which when the issue is on the other foot. >> senator reid has concerned about -- is it any precaution to keep non germain amendments of the bills? >> the senate allows for non relevant amendments. we will change that for the amendments given at the privileged position. how we address that is important. if someone offers a non jermaine amendment, the democrats don't want to vote on, they can offer an alternative to that side by side. we can move the table then of course, we could filibuster it by the way. okay? we do not change the senate practice and by the way, i don't believe that the so-called constitutional option does either if you see the constitutional option, they say that you can debate amendments, they don't provide whatever their procedure is to amendments. they do not restrict the amendments that they talk about to jermaine amendments or relevant amendments either. there is no difference. t
on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just passed tax cuts for the middle class americans and then fight later on for spending cuts and increasing taxes for the wealthy? caller: the tax cut for the general population is great. that would be good for stimulating the
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